Reprogramming of ADAS procedures becomes more and more critical as vehicles age.

With OBDI vehicles, the ECM calibrations were etched onto a computer chip called PROM. Vehicle programming could only be updated with new prom chip. Updating the ABS system (if applicable) or a system such as a module linked to ADAS was not even possible. As a result, many vehicles went to the scrapyard with the same factory programming.

Click here to read more

In 1988, engineers from all OEMs got together with the EPA and decided there had to be a better way to perform emissions testing and update a vehicle’s emissions software. which may not have been compliant.

As more and more miles are driven, the software behind the cameras has improved to classify objects and recognize problematic situations.

In 1994, some of the first OBDII vehicles hit the road with the 16 pin connector we know and love today. Beginning with the 1996 model year, all vehicles sold in the United States were required to have it and standardized protocols that would allow OEMs to update emissions calibrations and firmware in the field.

When OEMs got together to write OBDII standards, the focus wasn’t on hardware like PROM chips; the focus was more on software. They realized that a vehicle was not going to be brought back to the factory to be reprogrammed. Instead, it should be performed by qualified technicians. Thus, SAE J2534 was born to perform pass-thru programming in the field.

On all vehicles, electronic hardware is nothing without software or firmware. There are over 100 million lines of code in a recent vehicle, and even more if it is equipped with an advanced ADAS system. This code tells equipment when to change an automatic transmission or if the HVAC system recirculation door should be closed. Expecting the OEM to get every perfect line of code when it leaves the factory is an impossible task.

In 1994, some of the first OBDII vehicles hit the road with the 16 pin connector we know and love today. Beginning with the 1996 model year, all vehicles sold in the United States were required to have it and standardized protocols that would allow OEMs to update emissions calibrations and firmware in the field.

So why would an OEM want to update a vehicle’s programming? It could be as simple as reprogramming a new setting for an oxygen sensor or misfire monitor so that the check engine light does not come on during the 80,000 mile emissions warranty. . In other cases, it could be new software to fix a problem in the ABS.

Flashing or reprogramming the J2534 is a simple concept in theory. The procedure involves installing the latest software or firmware on a vehicle’s module using the OBDII port. The software comes from an OEM owned internet server, which does not want you to have it on your hard drive. OEMs around the world are setting up a system that allows software or code to “pass” to your computer and vehicle through a special interface.

As a vehicle ages, J2534 programming becomes even more important. Why? When a new module or component is installed, the OEM code or software must be installed for the new part to work.

Firmware or software that operates ABS and ADAS modules can improve performance and eliminate problems.

That’s enough high-level discussion and theory for now. Here are some important tools you need to start flashing or reprogramming in your store.

Buying and setting up a PC can be the hardest part of programming. Most OEMs require a Windows PC with specific hardware, operating system requirements, and user settings. The computer should only be used for programming and browsing OEM websites.

You must have a stable internet connection to flash or program modules on the vehicle. You cannot download a home vehicle file and install it when you get to the store. Never use Wi-Fi.

A J2534 pass-thru programmer is a box and / or cable to connect the PC to the vehicle and communicate with the correct pins on the OBDII connection. It is an interface that acts as a gateway that translates messages between the PC and the controller into a protocol that the vehicle understands. Many scan tool manufacturers manufacture J2534 pass-thru programmers; just make sure the programmer is certified by the OEM you plan to program.

An ADAS update can improve vehicle safety.

Some programming sessions can last over an hour and consume over 80 amps to operate vehicle components. Certain vehicles will operate the ABS pumps, electric power steering motors, and wipers as part of the reflash and calibration procedure. If the battery voltage drops below a defined voltage, the flashing process will stop and possibly damage the module being programmed. There are power supplies specially designed for programming.

Your scan tool should be able to read calibration verification numbers (CVNs) and mode $ 09 data. When an OEM releases an update, the new calibration number may be in a TSB. Always check the latest version of TSB. But, the latest calibration numbers will be listed on their service information website, so you will need to subscribe to the OEM service information website.

Flash reprogramming is not as intimidating as some articles and websites claim. Just take your time and follow all the instructions.

Source link

About Marco C. Nichols

Check Also

Honda Claims 5-Star NCAP Equivalent Safety For Latest Town

Honda Cars India claims the 5th Generation City has an ASEAN NCAP 5-star equivalent safety …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *