Northwest Arkansas pumpkin crops hit by dry weather

Believe it or not, fall is a week from Wednesday, and that means many of you will be hitting your local pumpkin plots soon, but how has the dry weather affected this harvest? year ? We all know it’s been dry lately and with plenty of pumpkins opening in the next week or two, we all know pumpkins need a lot of water to turn that bright orange we all love. . But with so little rainfall, there are concerns that some pumpkins may not be ready on time. There is officially one week left in the summer, and peering into a sea of ​​green is a sure sign of fall – pumpkins. And not just pumpkins, but squash of all kinds. But they all need water to grow and become the seasonal items we love. But the rain was scarce. 40/29 News rocked by a field owned by farmer Dennis McGarrah, he has several acres in Lowell and Pea Ridge dedicated to pumpkins and tells us the lack of rain forced him to irrigate his pumpkins. “If I didn’t have irrigation, it would be difficult right now, because everything would dry up because everyone can see that you don’t mow your lawn as often because after mowing it stops growing, and so on. ‘is also happening in the fields, “said McGarrah. He adds that it has been a year of extremes, the soil was almost too wet for him to even plant the seeds in June. Problem in itself.” McGarrah said.In order for a pumpkin to grow properly, it needs about two inches of water per week, and with some places not seeing much for months, McGarrah says that is on top of that. a big water bill that eats into his pumpkin profits. “It’s probably going to cost me $ 1,200 to $ 1,500,” M cGarrah said. But he adds that doesn’t mean the prices you’ll pay will go up. Also, what is not irrigated is the corn maze at Pea Ridge Farm, which is slightly shorter. t than it should be at this point in the year. “It’s starting to hurt a little bit, it doesn’t hurt too much because I don’t plant maize in my maze, I plant Sudan sorghum and it is very drought tolerant, and it does not deteriorate as quickly. than corn when it dries like that, ”McGarrah said. variety at hand despite the dry summer. McGarrah Farm in Pea Ridge opens next Saturday with all of their fall festivities.

Believe it or not, fall is a week from Wednesday, and that means many of you will be hitting your local pumpkins soon, but how has the dry weather impacted this year’s harvest?

We all know the weather has been dry lately and lots of pumpkin patches will open in the next week or two, we all know pumpkins need a lot of water to become that bright orange we all love. . But with so little rainfall, there are concerns that some pumpkins may not be ready on time.

There is officially one week left in the summer, and peering into a sea of ​​green is a sure sign of fall – pumpkins.

And not just pumpkins, but squash of all kinds. But they all need water to grow and become the seasonal items we love.

But the rain was scarce. 40/29 News rocked by a field owned by farmer Dennis McGarrah, he has several acres in Lowell and Pea Ridge dedicated to pumpkins and tells us the lack of rain forced him to irrigate his pumpkins.

“If I didn’t have irrigation, it would be hard right now, because everything would dry up because as everyone can see that you don’t mow your lawn as often because after mowing it stops growing, and so on. ‘is what’s happening in the field too, ”said McGarrah.

He adds that it has been a year of extremes, the soil was almost too wet for him to even plant the seeds in June.

“It was raining so much at the time that it was difficult for me to set the stage well and that was a problem in itself,” said McGarrah.

For a pumpkin to grow properly, it needs about two inches of water per week, and with some places not seeing much for months, McGarrah says that adds up to a hefty bill of water. water that eats away at its pumpkin profits.

“It’s probably going to cost me anywhere from $ 1,200 to $ 1,500,” McGarrah said.

But he adds that that doesn’t mean the prices you’ll pay will go up.

Plus, what’s not irrigated is the Pea Ridge Farm Corn Maze, which is slightly shorter than it should be at this point of the year.

“It’s starting to hurt a little bit, it doesn’t hurt too much because I don’t plant maize in my maze, I plant Sudan sorghum and it is very drought tolerant, and it does not deteriorate as quickly. than corn when it gets dry like that, ”McGarrah said.

He pointed out that if you’re coming to the pumpkin patch this fall, whether you’re shopping for the traditional pumpkin-lantern or the more festive baby-boo, they should have plenty of variety on hand despite the dry summer.

McGarrah Farm in Pea Ridge opens next Saturday with all of their fall festivities.

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About Marco C. Nichols

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