Nebraska drought affects Dodge County farmers

Grant Hansen farms about 1,000 acres in Ames, Nebraska, including a three-quarter mile stretch along the Platte River. This year’s drought, like many, has been hard on him and his crop. “I have spots in my field that have burned to the ground,” Hansen said. Hansen has seen about half an inch of rain since June. This lack of rain will affect how and when he harvests. will probably start in late September or the first part of October,” Hansen said. “Maize will probably dry out faster than it normally would in weather like this.” Nate Dorsey of the extension office of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln told KETV that Nebraska hasn’t had a drought like this year’s in almost a decade, which is pretty rare,” Dorsey said. “The last time Nebraska really struggled with a drought was in 2012. It’s been a while and even then I don’t know if it was as bad as it is today.” Hansen expects to produce a third of the dryland corn it typically produces and nearly 50 bushels less than expected for irrigation corn. With crop insurance, Hansen will be financially well off. As for the drought in Dodge County, a wet winter and spring could be contributing, according to Dorsey. Check out the Nebraska Drought Monitor here.

Grant Hansen farms approximately 1,000 acres in Ames, Nebraska, including a three-quarter mile stretch along the Platte River.

This year’s drought, like many others, has been hard on him and his crop.

“I have spots in my field that have burned to the ground,” Hansen said.

Hansen has seen about half an inch of rain since June. This lack of rain will affect how and when he harvests.

“I will probably start at the end of September or the first part of October,” Hansen said. “The corn will probably dry out faster than it normally would in weather like this.”

Nate Dorsey of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Office told KETV that Nebraska hasn’t experienced a drought like this year’s in nearly a decade.

“It’s pretty rare,” Dorsey said. “The last time Nebraska really struggled with a drought was in 2012. It’s been a while and even then I don’t know if it was as bad as it is today.”

Hansen expects to produce one-third of the dryland corn it typically produces and nearly 50 bushels less than expected for irrigated corn.

With crop insurance, Hansen will be financially well off. As for the drought in Dodge County, a wet winter and spring could contribute, according to Dorsey.

Check out the Nebraska Drought Monitor here.

About Marco C. Nichols

Check Also

Climate Adaptive Corn Presentation to be held September 10 | Food and drink

TOWNSHIP — As part of the Cornell Co-op extension of St. Lawrence County Local Food …