Cornwall beaches scenes on the last day of summer

As the decidedly autumnal month of August has at times given way to what began as a scorching September, the traditional Cornish summer is drawing to a close. All over the country, school children are returning to class and parents are returning to work.

As the holiday season draws to a close – unless you’re one of those lucky enough to be able to visit now it’s a bit quieter – the temperatures are north of 20 degrees and the sun is shining shines on all of us.

The weather is such that if for some, by the time they walk through the door, they catch fire, or for those looking to shake off the “Casper the Friendly Ghost” look one last time, the sun is there to provide.

Read more: The hottest spots in Devon and Cornwall as the mini heat wave begins

Make the most of it, because it won’t last forever. The Met Office, much like the postman when it’s the council’s new tax year brings bad news, after a mini-heatwave forecast rain later this week with downpours expected on Wednesday and Thursday as temperatures grab the headlines. something many of us wish we could – go back to late adolescence.

Just a few weeks ago the scene in Cornwall was very different from what we see in front of us today. Partiers who crowd at festivals like Boardmasters or explore one of Cornwall’s hot spots have given way to a quieter affair.

Even if you wouldn’t have known, the Tour of Britain only passed through Cornwall yesterday (September 5th) as the crowds came out for one last hurray at the end of summer.

Even Fistral Beach, so often the star of Cornish summer madness, was decidedly silent despite the sun providing a postcard view.

So what happened in Cornwall? We took a look at webcams across Cornwall to share with you the day view when summer has entered its seasonal slumber.

Fistral Beach



The view of Fistral beach

Today is a great day to visit one of Cornwall’s most popular beaches if you don’t like mingling with the crowds. The stampede of people who took to Fistral Beach in Newquay is gone except for a few and from there you can see the sands of this beautiful part of Cornwall’s coastline. Perfect for a family walk at the end of the day, for building sandcastles, or if you’re Mr. Burns, for releasing the dogs.

Towan Beach



Towan Beach, Newquay
Towan Beach, Newquay

Just a few days ago, Towan Beach in Newquay was teeming with people enjoying the sun and sea that the North Cornish coast has to offer. Today is a different story, with just a pinch of people, which means today is a big day for a social distancing beach visit. Not all of a sudden, however.

Watergate Bay



Watergate Bay, Newquay
Watergate Bay, Newquay

A tent opposes the change of seasons, as the crowds previously seen in this place of beauty vanish faster than if they had gone into quicksand to be replaced by a few people venturing out into the water.

Perranporth



Perranporth Beach
Perranporth Beach

The Watering Hole in Perranporth had a busy weekend, with the three-day Tunes in the Dunes event knocking down the roof in late summer. We can’t say we blame the staff there if they are relieved to see a quieter day after a manic summer. While a place like this is never completely silent, except perhaps in the early hours of a cold January morning, so unsurprisingly, there is a little sprinkling of a crowd.

Large Bay



Large Bay
Large Bay

Widemouth Bay on the North Cornish coast, although quieter than usual, is probably one of Cornwall’s busiest beaches today. The news has yet to reach Cornwall’s iconic gull population, who are undoubtedly hungry enough now that everyone has returned home as they don’t appear to be around.

Crooklets, Bude



Crooklets, Bude
Crooklets, Bude

On the beaches of Bude itself, people are descending on the beach … although as you might have guessed by now, fewer. Some find themselves enjoying the pool to the right of the picture while others are enjoying the beach itself. In the water, species of surfers commonly seen ride the waves.

Portreath



Portreath Beach
Portreath Beach

Hardly anyone here. Maybe they all went inland near Camborne and Hayle to try the pies after our reviewers tasted them in our search for the best pate in Cornwall.

Gwithian



Gwithian Beach
Gwithian Beach

Excuse us for a second while we check if this is from a webcam and not a postcard in the corner store. Surely it can’t be THAT calm in Gwithian, can it ?!

Pentewan Sands



Pentewan Sands, near St Austell
Pentewan Sands, near St Austell

This is Pentewan Sands, near St Austell. There are some people. On the beach. Not a lot of people, mind you, so if you fancy being a person enjoying one of Cornwall’s most shockingly spectacular beaches, give it a go. We won’t tell the boss.

Polzeath



Polzeath Beach
Polzeath Beach

After weeks and weeks of Cornwall having been so crowded, getting around felt like a 1960s Dalek when he encountered stairs, it is safe to say that Polzeath may be less busy than ‘it has not been. Nonetheless, after seeing some of Cornwall’s beaches as empty as a political promise, it’s a relief that there are still a small number on Polzeath enjoying the sun.

rock



Rocky beach
Rocky beach

There is hardly a soul or even a sole on Rock Beach, not even Gordon Ramsay. The other side of the Camel Estuary, which provides the culinary division with Rick Stein’s staple ground in Padstow, is a bit busier on the streets, however.

Saint-Mawes



Saint-Mawes
Saint-Mawes

If your kids are among the lucky few who haven’t gone back to school yet, here’s a great way to help them learn to count. Count the number of people in St Mawes.

One … two … three … four … five …. we make about nine or ten that we can see. However, trying to spot the people in this relatively deserted scene could also serve as an eye test if you’re too tight for Specsavers and can’t make it to Barnard Castle.

Mouse hole



Mouse hole
Mouse hole

There are more cyclists than people in this photo of Mousehole. It’s almost deserted – even Tom Bawcock and his cat aren’t around, but then maybe there’s a Storm Cat that needs to be appeased or a Stargazy Pie that needs to be baked.

Crantock



Crantock Beach
Crantock Beach

Let’s call this beach Echo, for the simple reason that it’s so deserted here that you’re more likely to hear your own echo than another beach goer’s conversation. No one even wants to play tennis.

And finally….



The view from Rock on Little Petherick Bridge
The view from Rock on Little Petherick Bridge

While browsing Cornwall beach webcams to see what everyone else was doing as a glorified neighborhood watch, we came across this particular scene from a camera in Rock.

While it is certainly true that many TV shows will salivate on Cornwall’s coastline, this particular scene caught our attention as it perfectly characterizes the breathtaking beauty of Cornwall.

This is the view from Rock towards Little Petherick Bridge on the Camel Trail, which from 1899 to 1967 witnessed the sounds of steam as visitors to Cornwall and commuters ventured across the railway bridge to find themselves get to Wadebridge and beyond.

These days it’s the Camel Trail, but maybe it’s no wonder that some people are willing to pay a sum of money that many of us will never see in our lives to live there. Because it is something. Cornwall is truly breathtaking on days like this.

And would you believe it, there is also a seagull.

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About Marco C. Nichols

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