Cornwill – Newlyn http://newlyn.info/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:16:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://newlyn.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Cornwill – Newlyn http://newlyn.info/ 32 32 How farmers make corn mazes https://newlyn.info/how-farmers-make-corn-mazes/ https://newlyn.info/how-farmers-make-corn-mazes/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:19:23 +0000 https://newlyn.info/how-farmers-make-corn-mazes/ Planting begins in the spring, but inspiration comes around July, the peak of summer, as farmers gaze at acres of haphazardly planted corn stalks, waiting to be sculpted into an interactive work of art that has also become a key ingredient in solid financial success.

Over the past two decades, since the mid-1990s, corn mazes have become one of the newer features of family farms. Often times, the younger generations who are about to take over the farm are the ones tasked with not only manifesting the maze, but also keeping the farm up to date with modern agritourism trends.

John Wright, owner of the Wright family farm in the picturesque hills of Warwick, Orange County, says agrotourism is an important part of the evolution of agriculture. And the festivals that encompass pumpkin picking, hay walks, apple cannons, games, treats and, of course, the corn maze, are one of the biggest events of all.

“You know, the funny thing is that growing up hay was a job,” Wright said. “But when my oldest was in school 30-40 years ago, I was pretty involved in PTA and they did this carnival thing. I volunteered, said I would be happy to help, and they asked if I could take a cart ride. I said, ‘I can, but I don’t know why anyone would want to do this.’ Then it was crazy popular. So I’m like ‘OK, what do I know?’

“It was long before this idea of ​​agrotourism was a thing,” he continued. “The pumpkin patch and the corn maze were some of the first things we did, they’re still the most popular. And now we add a few more things every year to keep it looking new.

At the Rhinebeck-based Kesicke family farm, the corn maze and the fall festival in general may one day be the last tradition in operation. Frank Vosburgh Sr., the owner, raised three children on the farm who are helping to organize the annual six-weekend fall festival. When he retires, that’s the only part of farming they want to continue.

Corn mazes are a key draw in these festivities, and making a good one is key.

Crisscrossing rows of corn for labyrinths

Most farms use grain corn for their maze. “Sweet corn puts all of its energy into making corn taste great,” said John Kelder. “Grain corn makes the stalks stand up well. “

Kelder Farm

Considered the master designer, John Kelder is the 12th generation of his family who takes care of Kelder’s Farm. Founded in 1779, the bicentennial gem of Kerhonkson in County Ulster is easy to spot as visitors are greeted at the entrance to Route 209 by Gnome Chomsky – a towering 13-foot lawn ornament that the Guinness Book of records once named the largest extant (a feat that has since been broken).

Farm owner John’s father Chris Kelder said they were the first to adapt to the corn maze, building their first in 1996. “We were already growing pumpkins and it seemed like a nice activity to add, ”he said. “People are looking for things to do outside as a family, that’s kind of how the culture has evolved.”

Every year, it all starts for the Kelders in early May when they take a corn planter to a six-acre field in the valley below their farm, scattering about 30,000 seeds per acre. Wright said the corn for the mazes is planted in an atypical way – crisscrossing rows instead of maintaining straight lines to form a wall of leaves that wanderers can’t see through.

“We use grain corn,” Chris explained. “And the reason is that sweet corn is shorter corn; it does not grow very high. It is a weaker and weaker plant.


John added, “Sweet corn puts all its energy into making corn taste great. Corn for grain keeps the stalks together.

John builds the corn maze with a different pattern each year. It’s a process he usually begins a few days before cutting the labyrinthine paths in July, when the stems have reached knee height. Using grid paper, with each block representing a 3-foot square on the ground, they sketch out a design to use as a map.

Typically, John takes his younger cousins’ comments into account while determining what fall or farm theme he would like to see incorporated into the maze. They are, he laughs, the artists of the Kelder clan.

Between bouncing around ideas and finalizing the design, he said it was a pretty quick process that can be completed in a day or two. Hard work comes with mowing, especially if he’s out in the field and realizes the design won’t work with the terrain – sometimes he had to stop halfway to make changes to the map.

This year’s maze is shaped like a pumpkin. It may take 15 minutes or several hours for the maze walkers to complete, depending on their level of wisdom and whether they are distracted by the toys and forts built into them. John aims to make it difficult by incorporating many identical dead ends and corners, but not so difficult that visitors get frustrated.

Either way, he’s guaranteed to go on a “rescue mission” several times a season, he laughed, when a lost soul calls for help in midfield.

John Kelder’s method is relatively standard in the world of corn maze design. Frank Vosburgh, Jr., however, is not.

At Kesicke Farm, Frank Vosburgh, Jr. approaches the 10 acres of tall stems as if a fresh layer of snow had fallen overnight – untouched, unblemished, waiting for footprints, snow angels and snowflakes. sleigh tracks make their mark. He did not sketch a plan; it’s all in his head as he flies, moving and cutting wherever the wind takes him.

The sound of the zero-turn mower he drives – faster and more maneuverable than a tractor – is his meditation. He doesn’t even put on his headphones while sculpting art in the field for at least two hours.

Frank Vosburgh, Jr.’s designs are clearly difficult, his sister Lisa Vosburgh said. Every year, as patrons leave their Fall Festival weekend, she hears the same comeback: They can’t finish the maze. Only a few a year succeed; regulars often come back for a second shot.

Wright’s mazes at his Warwick farm are elaborate – this year’s creation features nursery rhyme characters, with a cow leaping over a moon and a cat playing the violin.

Frank Vosburgh Sr. raised three children who were all involved in organizing the annual six-weekend Kesicke Farm Fall Festival, where their 10-acre maze is a key feature.  When he retires, the festival is the only part of farming the next generation wants to pursue.

Frank Vosburgh Sr. raised three children who were all involved in organizing the annual six-weekend Kesicke Farm Fall Festival, where their 10-acre maze is a key feature. When he retires, the festival is the only part of farming the next generation wants to pursue.

Kesicke farm

Aside from planting nearly 10 acres on two corn fields, her family doesn’t create the maze themselves. Outside Utah contractors, The MAiZE, come every summer to design and build it. He said they used a similar method to John Kelder’s farm: they sketch on grid paper designating each box in 20 rows, then they place flags in the field to demarcate each box and cut the paths. section by section.

Wright spends $ 2,500 per year on the service of the company. Ultimately, he believes that contracting them ensures the maze will be done right and saves his family at least a week’s work. In addition, financially, it pays off.

While all the farmers were reluctant to discuss the exact income from their corn mazes, they echoed similar sentiments about their importance. Kelder said fall tourism accounts for about 70% of their profits. Visitors pay $ 15 for access on fall weekends, $ 12 on weekdays.

“This is what keeps us going,” said Frank Vosburgh, Sr., referring to their fall tourist season. “Do well or undone that year. “

In a good year, Wright said the farm hosted 10,000 attendees, paying $ 17 for the full set of attractions. That doesn’t include visitors coming for the pumpkin patch, which he says is probably their most popular feature. The corn maze, however, is very close.


Related: Corn Mazes To Get Lost In


“The three big things people come for are our animals they can feed, the corn maze, and the wagon rides,” Lisa said of Kesicke Farm, which charges $ 8 for the corn maze or $ 15. $ for a set of attractions. “Every year we have more and more people coming from further and further afield. We get a lot of people from below by [NYC], and the corn maze has a lot to do with it. I think they want a place where they can do a lot of these things, but at a lower cost. “

Much of fall’s success depends on Mother Nature’s notoriously fickle, a tough line to weed. While rainy weekends don’t necessarily deter all business – Wright recalled a few years ago when it opened in pouring rain just so a customer could propose in the middle of the pumpkin – the cute stories are not enough to overcome the financial loss.

“You know, you can do everything right and then the weather adjusts to your farm,” Wright said. He’s worried about his pumpkins this year and worries whether they’ll hold up after two tropical storms have raged.

“We are just hoping for nice weekends in the fall. Rain can come on Wednesday, ”said Chris Kelder with a laugh.

Despite the recent downpours, at the start of the season in early September, the corn on farms in the area blooms with a vibrant green glow. By Halloween, the stems will have dried to a yellowish-brown tint.

Nothing is lost. The corn will be pulled from the ground with a combine harvester and used as farm animal feed for months to come, when the fields freeze over and temporarily turn into a snowy landscape.

Then it melts; springs comes back once more. And the Hudson Valley farmers are starting over, preparing to build on their new tradition.

Waterfall in the Hudson Valley



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Northwest Winefest to see artists from the Midwest | https://newlyn.info/northwest-winefest-to-see-artists-from-the-midwest/ https://newlyn.info/northwest-winefest-to-see-artists-from-the-midwest/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://newlyn.info/northwest-winefest-to-see-artists-from-the-midwest/

MOUND CITY, Mo. – The 12th Annual Great Northwest Winefest in Missouri will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. this Saturday, September 18 at North Griffith Park in Mound City.

The event will include wine tastings, vendors, food and live music.

Admission is $ 25 and includes unlimited wine tastings and a souvenir tasting glass for those over 21. The cost of entry for children ages 5-10 is $ 5, and children 4 and under enter free. Pets are not accepted.

Participating wineries include 503 Winery LLC, Baltimore Bend Vineyard, Fence Stile Vineyards & Winery, Grindstone Valley Winery, Jowler Creek Vineyard & Winery, Prestyn’s Wine Bar, Top Hat Winery, Weston Wine Company and Windy Wine Company. Some of the wines are made with Mound City grapes, a press release noted.

Food vendors will include The Enchilada Lady, Grill Sergeant and Andrew County Rotary Club. Huckleberry Ridge Bakery and Pop Henry’s Kettle Corn will be selling baked goods and snacks at the event. A full bar will be provided by Toad Hollar Bar & Grill in the refuge.

According to a press release, live music will be performed by Devon and Mikaela Sons from 12 noon to 1 pm; Lauren Bergman Johnson, 1 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Ben Johnson, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. and from 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. and Ladies in Black, 4:45 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.

Devon and Mikaela Sons, citizens of Rock Port, Missouri, perform and stage at the Liberty Theater in Rock Port. Devon is a deputy sheriff and Mikaela is a teacher in their town. They have played Winefest since its inception.

Lauren Bergman Johnson has performed in tribute to people such as Judy Garland and Shania Twain across the Midwest. She has experience singing in a multitude of venues, including alumni gatherings and college musicals and operas.

Ben Johnson is a global tribute artist to Elvis from the Stanberry, Missouri area. In his efforts to show who Elvis was in the 50s and 60s, he sings, speaks, and dresses the role. Johnson also sings a tribute to Frank Sinatra, Johnny Cash and more.

Ladies in Black is a musical group made up of four women from Atchison County: Debra Wyatt, Deb Johnson, Lynn Hunter and Terri Jackson. Wyatt and Hunter are currently teachers, while Johnson is a retired educator.

The Casady brothers consist of Patrick and Tim Casady. Depending on the occasion, they perform a variety of music, from country to classic rock, with a full band or in acoustics.

Tickets can be purchased at the event or in advance at nwmef.org/winefest or on Missouri’s Great Northwest Winefest Facebook page.

The event raises funds for Northwest Missouri Enterprise Facilitation, a nonprofit organization that provides entrepreneurs and small businesses with free counseling in Nodaway, Andrew, Atchison, Gentry, Holt and Worth counties.

For more information on Winefest, find the event on social networks.

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Northwest Arkansas pumpkin crops hit by dry weather https://newlyn.info/northwest-arkansas-pumpkin-crops-hit-by-dry-weather/ https://newlyn.info/northwest-arkansas-pumpkin-crops-hit-by-dry-weather/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 10:57:00 +0000 https://newlyn.info/northwest-arkansas-pumpkin-crops-hit-by-dry-weather/ Believe it or not, fall is a week from Wednesday, and that means many of you will be hitting your local pumpkin plots soon, but how has the dry weather affected this harvest? year ? We all know it’s been dry lately and with plenty of pumpkins opening in the next week or two, we all know pumpkins need a lot of water to turn that bright orange we all love. . But with so little rainfall, there are concerns that some pumpkins may not be ready on time. There is officially one week left in the summer, and peering into a sea of ​​green is a sure sign of fall – pumpkins. And not just pumpkins, but squash of all kinds. But they all need water to grow and become the seasonal items we love. But the rain was scarce. 40/29 News rocked by a field owned by farmer Dennis McGarrah, he has several acres in Lowell and Pea Ridge dedicated to pumpkins and tells us the lack of rain forced him to irrigate his pumpkins. “If I didn’t have irrigation, it would be difficult right now, because everything would dry up because everyone can see that you don’t mow your lawn as often because after mowing it stops growing, and so on. ‘is also happening in the fields, “said McGarrah. He adds that it has been a year of extremes, the soil was almost too wet for him to even plant the seeds in June. Problem in itself.” McGarrah said.In order for a pumpkin to grow properly, it needs about two inches of water per week, and with some places not seeing much for months, McGarrah says that is on top of that. a big water bill that eats into his pumpkin profits. “It’s probably going to cost me $ 1,200 to $ 1,500,” M cGarrah said. But he adds that doesn’t mean the prices you’ll pay will go up. Also, what is not irrigated is the corn maze at Pea Ridge Farm, which is slightly shorter. t than it should be at this point in the year. “It’s starting to hurt a little bit, it doesn’t hurt too much because I don’t plant maize in my maze, I plant Sudan sorghum and it is very drought tolerant, and it does not deteriorate as quickly. than corn when it dries like that, ”McGarrah said. variety at hand despite the dry summer. McGarrah Farm in Pea Ridge opens next Saturday with all of their fall festivities.

Believe it or not, fall is a week from Wednesday, and that means many of you will be hitting your local pumpkins soon, but how has the dry weather impacted this year’s harvest?

We all know the weather has been dry lately and lots of pumpkin patches will open in the next week or two, we all know pumpkins need a lot of water to become that bright orange we all love. . But with so little rainfall, there are concerns that some pumpkins may not be ready on time.

There is officially one week left in the summer, and peering into a sea of ​​green is a sure sign of fall – pumpkins.

And not just pumpkins, but squash of all kinds. But they all need water to grow and become the seasonal items we love.

But the rain was scarce. 40/29 News rocked by a field owned by farmer Dennis McGarrah, he has several acres in Lowell and Pea Ridge dedicated to pumpkins and tells us the lack of rain forced him to irrigate his pumpkins.

“If I didn’t have irrigation, it would be hard right now, because everything would dry up because as everyone can see that you don’t mow your lawn as often because after mowing it stops growing, and so on. ‘is what’s happening in the field too, ”said McGarrah.

He adds that it has been a year of extremes, the soil was almost too wet for him to even plant the seeds in June.

“It was raining so much at the time that it was difficult for me to set the stage well and that was a problem in itself,” said McGarrah.

For a pumpkin to grow properly, it needs about two inches of water per week, and with some places not seeing much for months, McGarrah says that adds up to a hefty bill of water. water that eats away at its pumpkin profits.

“It’s probably going to cost me anywhere from $ 1,200 to $ 1,500,” McGarrah said.

But he adds that that doesn’t mean the prices you’ll pay will go up.

Plus, what’s not irrigated is the Pea Ridge Farm Corn Maze, which is slightly shorter than it should be at this point of the year.

“It’s starting to hurt a little bit, it doesn’t hurt too much because I don’t plant maize in my maze, I plant Sudan sorghum and it is very drought tolerant, and it does not deteriorate as quickly. than corn when it gets dry like that, ”McGarrah said.

He pointed out that if you’re coming to the pumpkin patch this fall, whether you’re shopping for the traditional pumpkin-lantern or the more festive baby-boo, they should have plenty of variety on hand despite the dry summer.

McGarrah Farm in Pea Ridge opens next Saturday with all of their fall festivities.

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State’s Mainly Good Corn Harvest Nears Harvest End | Business https://newlyn.info/states-mainly-good-corn-harvest-nears-harvest-end-business/ https://newlyn.info/states-mainly-good-corn-harvest-nears-harvest-end-business/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 19:00:50 +0000 https://newlyn.info/states-mainly-good-corn-harvest-nears-harvest-end-business/

The Mississippi corn crop has faced challenges ranging from a mid-season flood to an early September hurricane, but yields and quality appear positive on the near-full harvest.

On September 13, the US Department of Agriculture estimated that the crop had been harvested at 75%. Its most recent assessment indicated that 84% were in good or excellent condition. Mississippi had about 640,000 acres of corn in 2021.

Erick Larson, a grain crop specialist at the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the state’s large corn acreage – although it does not hit the high of 850,000 acres set in 2007 – has been spurred by high prices and favorable planting conditions.

“We had less than normal rainfall in March and April, which helped planting corn and allowed growers to plant all or even exceed their intentions,” Larson said. “This is a rare event, as rainfall normally prevents farmers from planting as much corn area as expected. “

Benefiting from timely planting and a dry May, the crop developed under exceptional conditions early in the season, Larson said. The second week of June brought heavy precipitation, especially in the northern Mississippi, where 10 to 15 inches caused extensive flooding.

While some areas dried up within days, the delta’s river systems suffered severe flooding, which killed crops that were flooded for more than five or six days. In some cases, the fields remained flooded for several weeks.

“The impact was catastrophic because all the crops were planted and inputs added, so the dollar value of losses per acre was extremely high,” Larson said.

According to the MSU Extension “2021 Mississippi Agricultural Crop Damage Assessment” report, Bolivar and Sunflower counties had the largest area of ​​corn lost to flooding. The value of the actual damage varied depending on whether the crop was damaged but survived or was destroyed and had to be replanted as soybeans.

The northern delta counties of Bolivar, Coahoma, Sunflower and Tallahatchie each suffered maize losses estimated at between $ 10 million and $ 29 million.

The corn should show good yields, but not as high as they could have been. Rainfall in June was two to four times normal, which will limit corn productivity, Larson said.

“The main challenges this season associated with excessively wet weather were developmental delay, pollination failure, nitrogen loss and accidental disease,” said Larson.

Although there have been a few leaf diseases, including Curvularia leaf spot, southern rust, and southern corn leaf blight, none have become a crisis situation.

“There was more than normal interest in managing these diseases because the commodity prices were so good and the yield potential was high,” Larson said.

The maize harvest is expected to be completed in the Delta by mid-September, and the end of the month for maize planted elsewhere. Precipitation, cool weather and humidity have slowed the drying process and the progress of the harvest to date.

Corn will get good prices when it hits the market. Will Maples, agricultural extension economist, said there has been a great improvement in the corn market since 2020.

“The December futures contract peaked above $ 6 in early May and again in early June, and December futures have traded consistently above $ 5 since early April,” Maples said. “The main driver of corn prices has been strong export demand. “

The USDA recorded a national average farm price for corn of $ 3.56 per bushel in 2019 and $ 4.40 per bushel in 2020. The current projected national average farm price is $ 5.75. Strong exports help keep the price high. The USDA estimates a 56% increase in US corn exports in the last marketing year, much of which can be attributed to large purchases from China.

“Corn exports are currently expected to remain strong for the 2021 marketing year,” Maples said. “Ethanol remains a key source of demand for US corn, with current projections at 5,200 million bushels for 2021, an increase of 125 million bushels from last year.”

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Unpopular advice: sweet corn tastes great https://newlyn.info/unpopular-advice-sweet-corn-tastes-great/ https://newlyn.info/unpopular-advice-sweet-corn-tastes-great/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 18:20:01 +0000 https://newlyn.info/unpopular-advice-sweet-corn-tastes-great/

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Columnist Ally Formeller thinks sweet corn is the perfect seasonal treat for fall.

As Halloween approaches, grocery stores are starting to fill their displays with seasonal candy, including candy corn. Most customers ignore these displays and go for something softer.

But sweet corn is the perfect seasonal treat.

The biggest problem with sweet corn is its texture.

While most people could do without the smooth, waxy texture, that’s what really makes candy corn the perfect treat. Unlike caramel or gummy candies, sweet corn doesn’t get stuck in the teeth, and unlike sour candies like Nerds or SweeTarts, it’s not too crunchy. The waxy, slightly chewy texture allows you to really sink your teeth in as the candy crumbles and melts in your mouth, letting the flavors dissolve on your tongue.

Sweet corn isn’t too sweet either. In Brach’s sweet corn, the main ingredient is sugar, but the small pieces of candy do not taste extremely sweet. The sweet and creamy flavors of vanilla, honey and butter combine in a perfect and fleeting sensation of saccharinity. Putting one or two in your mouth only affords a moment of sweetness as they crumble, but they leave nothing to be desired.

As Halloween approaches, there is no shortage of other treats. But sweet corn is really reminiscent of this time of year. Eating a piece of sweet corn immediately conjures up anticipation of cool October weather, cozy sweaters, and Halloween.

The color palette alone matches that of the approaching fall season. The bright white, orange and yellow stripes reflect the changing leaves and are inviting rather than sickly. Even the pumpkin-shaped sweet corn is eye-catching: its neon green stem and bright orange base are cute and whimsical, and match the cozy feel of early fall and changing leaves.

Candy corn not only has unique shapes and colors, it also has a unique history. It’s no secret that sweet corn is based on real corn kernels – that’s because in the late 1880s companies wanted to market agriculture themed sweets to farmers and their families.

Sweet corn will probably never be most people’s favorite candy. But even though it has become cool to hate sweet corn, it’s worth buying a bag or two. Whether it’s shaped like a traditional triangle or looks like a pumpkin, sweet corn is a staple of the fall season. By indulging in this Halloween classic, you are celebrating over 100 years of American agricultural history. And you feast your taste buds too.

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The 2021 crop yield potential remains highly variable https://newlyn.info/the-2021-crop-yield-potential-remains-highly-variable/ https://newlyn.info/the-2021-crop-yield-potential-remains-highly-variable/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 16:31:01 +0000 https://newlyn.info/the-2021-crop-yield-potential-remains-highly-variable/

Most crop experts agree that corn and soybean yields in 2021 are likely to be very variable and very difficult to predict, especially in drought-affected areas of Minnesota, western Iowa, Dakota. from North and South Dakota.

Recent precipitation, along with a few severe generalized storms, could certainly change the crop forecast in some areas. Most of the harvest information in yield estimates released by the US Department of Agriculture and private companies was based on harvest conditions from early to mid-August, so any major changes in conditions after this period could affect future performance projections.

Fairly extensive and heavy rains were received in many parts of the Upper Midwest during the last 10 days of August, including some of the extremely dry areas of southwestern and midwestern Minnesota, northeastern western Iowa and eastern South Dakota.